May 22, 2017
 
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DR#: 24 The Leader’s Lasting Contribution: Reproducing Generations of Leaders

Introduction

Rule 209 of the Rule of Life states that: “Authority draws its inspiration from the Spirit of Christ, who came not to be served, but to serve. It is at the service of the common good in keeping with the religious and apostolic aims of the Institute.” This rule gives us not only the imperative to exercise authority as service but it also powerfully reminds us that this leadership is always to be focused on the evangelization of the world, particularly through the education of youth.

Lumen Gentium, The Apostolic Constitution on the Church, puts our mission of leadership in a historical continuum for us by stating, “The divine mission entrusted to the apostles by Jesus will continue to the end of time, since the Gospel they handed on is the lasting source of all life for the Church. Therefore, the apostles took care to appoint successors.”

In the concluding chapter of Developing The Leaders Around You, John Maxwell explores how to bring such lofty expectations down to our day-to-day life. In Chapter Ten, “The Leader’s Lasting Contribution: Reproducing Generations of Leaders”, he asserts that, “True success comes only when every generation continues to develop the next generation, teaching them the value and the method of developing the next group of leaders.”

So Maxwell’s measure of a leader’s effort is not just present performance or even in producing the next generation of leaders. It is in establishing a culture, or a discipline if you will, that has each succeeding generation of leaders valuing and developing the next generation of leaders.

The crucial reminder for us is that those leaders must be in the historical line referred to in Lumen Gentium. For us, those leaders must be apostles committed to serve the mission of evangelization through the education of youth.

Through this directed reading, the participant will:

  • explore the progression of a person with some leadership qualities into a servant apostolic leader;
  • consider what it means to make the development of apostolic leaders a lifestyle.
Readings
  • Rule of Life, Chapter XII: “The Service of Authority”, #’s 209-212
  • Developing The Leaders Around You, Chapter Ten, “The Leader’s Lasting Contribution: Reproducing Generations of Leaders”, pp. 197-213
Suggestions for Journal Reflection
  1. Who in your experience best personifies a servant apostolic leader? What are the qualities in that person that cause you to make such a judgment? Do you have those qualities? If you are lacking some of these, how could you develop them in yourself? How would you help others develop similar qualities to enhance their leadership potential?
  2. Rule 212 refers to the twin responsibilities of animation and administration. What does animation mean to you as you reflect on the role of leaders in our schools? What does the term mean in light of developing future leaders?
  3. Maxwell contends that the development of others must become a lifestyle if we are to create a culture that will foster teaching the value and the method of developing future leaders. Write a commentary on Rule 210 to express this belief for a school leader committed to the development of future leaders.
Prayer

A Meditation:

Our relationship to our fellow human beings within the body of 
Christ is of paramount importance. 
Our roles as the ministers of Christ, 
our assignments as His beloved servants may vary greatly. 
Some of us are leaders who have been granted a position of authority 
over others. 
We ought to be aware that our social and educational status, 
regardless of what it means to our peers, does not impress our 
Lord; every one of His children is equally important to Him. 
And we need to be reminded, from time to time, that 
with leadership comes responsibility to treat 
those who work under us as equals before God, and to love 
them as such, our brothers and sisters in Christ. 
We are, every one of us, the ministers of God. 
There are those who serve God even in the process of serving us. 
They are those who make it possible for us to fulfill our responsibilities in 
our arena of service. 
We need each other, parent and child, employer and employee, 
master and servant. 
We must, together, submit to the Master of masters, the Lord of lords, 
our Redeemer and king, our Father and our God. 
Together we seek to fulfill his objectives and advance 
His kingdom upon our world. 
We do so as members of the same family, 
the family of God and Christ. 

Philemon, Epistles/Now 
Leslie F. Brandt 

Readings

 

Rule of Life, #209-226

Chapter XII
THE SERVICE OF FRATERNAL AUTHORITY

209. Service

Authority draws its inspiration from the Spirit of Christ, 
who came not to be served, but to serve.
It is at the service of the common good, 
in keeping with the religious
and apostolic aims of the Institute.

210. Fraternal Authority  

Authority is exercised so as to help the brothers become attentive to the Spirit 
and co-responsible for the formation of a true community
of life and apostolate. 

211. Role of Authority 

After reasonable consultation, authority sets common objectives, 
encourages and coordinates initiatives, makes necessary decisions, 
and intervenes to prevent abuses and to correct errors. 

212. Animation and Administration 

The service of authority has the functions of animation and administration. 
It affects every brother, each local community, and all levels of government. 

 

 

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